Video | Societatea Tolkien din România

Mai jos puteți găsi principalele clipuri video încărcate pe canalul YouTube al Societății, pe care vă invităm să îl vizitați, pentru o mai bună interacțiune.

Înregistrări video cu Prof. Tolkien

  • J.R.R. Tolkien la BBC “In Their Own Words”. Ediția din 30 martie 1968 a emisiunii “In Their Own Words: British Novelists” (BBC 2) îl are ca invitat pe prof. Tolkien. John Izzard se întâlnește cu profesorul acasă la acesta, se plimbă împreună cu el prin locațiile din Oxford și îi ascultă propriile opinii despre uriașul succes al operelor sale. Scurte interviuri cu studenți la Oxford sunt împletite în reportaj, pentru a releva gama largă de interpretări suscitate de Stăpânul Inelelor, de la entuziasmul debordant la critica moderată.
  • Fragmente din documentarul “J.R.R. Tolkien – An Awfully Big Adventure” (despre limbile Ardei)
  • Diverse înregistrări de arhivă cu J.R.R. Tolkien (1968)
  • J.R.R. Tolkien intervievat de Dennis Gerrolt (BBC) (1971)

Conferințe

  • „How to read J.R.R. Tolkien”. Carnegie Mellon University alumnus Michael D. C. Drout returned to campus for a talk on “How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien.” Drout, a professor of English and director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College in Norton, Mass, believes that Tolkien’s immense and lasting popularity can be explained by a “perfect storm hypothesis.”
  • J.R.R. Tolkien’s imaginary languages – In this lecture, delivered at Western Washington University Nov. 14, 2012, Edward Vajda, a professor in the Modern and Classical Languages Department at Western, discusses “Tolkien’s Imaginary Languages.” Tolkien’s extensive knowledge of world languages both ancient and modern lent itself to his creation of the artificial languages that add so much realistic depth to his fictional writing. Vajda’s presentation will describe the languages Tolkien created for his Middle Earth by revealing their connection with the actual spoken languages he studied during his academic career. Watch this lecture to explore the ingenious sound symbolism and etymological connotations employed by this master storyteller—and learn a great many things about the real languages of Eurasia along the way.
  • Lewis and Tolkien – Scholars and Friends – Prelegere a prof. Christopher Mitchell de la Wheaton College (SUA) despre relația dintre C. S. Lewis și J.R.R. Tolkien.
  • Robert Lazu și H.R. Patapievici, despre J.R.R. Tolkien – Înregistrare din anul 2008, de la emisiunea “Înapoi la argument” (TVR2).
  • „Trees, Chainsaws, and the Visions of Paradise in J.R.R. Tolkien”, by Tom Shippey – „Trees, Chainsaws, and the Visions of Paradise in J.R.R. Tolkien” by Tom Shippey. From „J.R.R. Tolkien: The Man Behind The Lord of the Rings”, held at The Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Symposium, 11/2/2002.

 

Atelier de limba elfică / Elvish language workshop

Ediția a 5-a a „Final Frontier” (www.finalfrontier.ro/) desfășurată la București pe 2 și 3 aprilie 2016 a găzduit printre alte evenimente un atelier introductiv de limba Quenya (limba elfilor nobili). „Profesorii”: membri ai Societății Tolkien din România, www.tolkien.ro

La răscrucea dintre credință, literatură și industrie cinematografică: J.R.R. Tolkien

Cătălin Sturza (Societatea Tolkien din România) despre cea de-a treia conferință a Societății și despre dimensiunea teologică a operelor Profesorului. Universul Credinței, TVR1, 11 ianuarie 2015.

Lord of the Rings: How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien

Carnegie Mellon University alumnus Michael D. C. Drout returned to campus for a talk on "How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien." Drout, a professor of English and director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College in Norton, Mass, believes that Tolkien's immense and lasting popularity can be explained by a "perfect storm hypothesis." Read more at http://www.hss.cmu.edu/pressreleases/pressreleases/drout.html

J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginary languages by Edward Vajda, WWU Linguistics Program director

J.R.R. Tolkien, wildly popular for his authorship of the fantasy trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," was by profession an unprepossessing Medievalist and historical linguist. In this lecture, delivered at Western Washington University Nov. 14, 2012, Edward Vajda, a professor in the Modern and Classical Languages Department at Western, discusses "Tolkien's Imaginary Languages." Tolkien's extensive knowledge of world languages both ancient and modern lent itself to his creation of the artificial languages that add so much realistic depth to his fictional writing. Vajda's presentation will describe the languages Tolkien created for his Middle Earth by revealing their connection with the actual spoken languages he studied during his academic career. Watch this lecture to explore the ingenious sound symbolism and etymological connotations employed by this master storyteller—and learn a great many things about the real languages of Eurasia along the way. Sponsored by the WWU Linguistics Club.

The Hidden Meaning of the Lord of the Rings - Joseph Pearce (Sample)

http://www.CatholicCourses.com/ Actually, Tolkien did say explicitly that LOTR is "of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work." In his letter written to Fr. Robert Murray on December 2, 1953. To see the letter yourself, you can Google "file:pdf tolkien letters" and open the first result. It's in Letter #142. "The religious element is absorbed into the story and the symbolism". Tolkien did state that he disliked allegory, but that is another discussion.

"Trees, Chainsaws, and the Visions of Paradise in J.R.R. Tolkien" by Tom Shippey

„Trees, Chainsaws, and the Visions of Paradise in J.R.R. Tolkien" by Tom Shippey. From „J.R.R. Tolkien: The Man Behind The Lord of the Rings", held at The Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Symposium, 11/2/2002

Lewis and Tolkien: Scholars and Friends

Prelegere a prof. Christopher Mitchell de la Wheaton College (SUA) despre relația dintre C. S. Lewis și J.R.R. Tolkien. A wonderful lecture on the relationship of two giants of global literature: prof. Christopher Mitchell of Wheaton College opens the door to insights and events publicly observed in the lives of C. S. Lewis and J.R. R. Tolkien and their fascinating relationships with members of the literary elite.

Robert Lazu si H.R. Patapievici despre J.R.R. Tolkien

Robert Lazu și H.R. Patapievici, în discuție despre J.R.R. Tolkien Înregistrare din anul 2008, de la emisiunea "Înapoi la argument" (TVR2)

Part of Interview with J.R.R. Tolkien in 1968 and Adam Tolkien in 2007

Part of Interview with J.R.R. Tolkien in 1968 and Adam Tolkien in 2007 about „The Children of Hurin" Romanian Tolkien Society http://www.tolkien.ro

J.R.R. Tolkien @ BBC - In Their Own Words: British Novelists (1968)

BBC - In Their Own Words: British Novelists. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien BBC 2, First broadcast 30 March 1968 Romanian Tolkien Society http://www.tolkien.ro

J.R.R. Tolkien Interview (1971)

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien interview for BBC (rep. Dennis Gerolt) 1971

Tolkien archive footage (1968) sequence 7/7

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Tolkien archive footage (1968) sequence 1/7

Tolkien archive footage (1968) sequence 1/7

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Tolkien archive footage (1968) sequence 2/7

"J.R.R. Tolkien - An Awfully Big Adventure" (fragment - Tolkien speaks of death)

A short extract from the documentary "J.R.R. Tolkien - An Awfully Big Adventure" http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching! tolkien, christopher tolkien, silmarillion, hobbit, languages, quenya, sindarin, lord of the rings, educational

J.R.R. Tolkien recites The Hoard

J.R.R. Tolkien recites "The Hoard" (a poem from "The Adventures of Tom Bombadil") "When the moon was new and the sun young of silver and gold the gods sung: in the green grass they silver spilled, and the white waters they with gold filled. Ere the pit was dug or Hell yawned, ere dwarf was bred or dragon spawned, there were Elves of old, and strong spells under green hills in hollow dells they sang as they wrought many fair things, and the bright crowns of the Elf-kings. But their doom fell, and their song waned, by iron hewn and by steel chained. Greed that sang not, nor with mouth smiled, in dark holes their wealth piled, graven silver and carven gold: over Elvenhome the shadow rolled. There was an old dwarf in a dark cave, to silver and gold his fingers clave; with hammer and tongs and anvil-stone he worked his hands to the hard bone. and coins he made, and strings of rings, and thought to buy the power of kings. But his eyes grew dim and his ears dull and the skin yellow on his old skull; through his bony claw with a pale sheen the stony jewels slipped unseen. No feet he heard, though the earth quaked. when the young dragon his thirst slaked. and the stream smoked at his dark door. The flames hissed on the dank floor, and he died alone in the red fire; his bones were ashes in the hot mire. There was an old dragon under grey stone; his red eyes blinked as he lay alone. His joy was dead and his youth spent, he was knobbed and wrinkled, and his limbs bent in the long years to his gold chained; in his heart's furnace the fire waned. To his belly's slime gems stuck thick, silver and gold he would snuff and lick: he knew the place of the least ring beneath the shadow of his black wing. Of thieves he thought on his hard bed, and dreamed that on their flesh he fed, their bones crushed, and their blood drank: his ears drooped and his breath sank. Mail-rings rang. He heard them not. A voice echoed in his deep grot: a young warrior with a bright sword called him forth to defend his hoard. His teeth were knives, and of horn his hide, but iron tore him, and his flame died. There was an old king on a high throne: his white beard lay on knees of bone; his mouth savoured neither meat nor drink, nor his ears song; he could only think of his huge chest with carven lid where pale gems and gold lay hid in secret treasury in the dark ground; its strong doors were iron-bound. The swords of his thanes were dull with rust, his glory fallen, his rule unjust, his halls hollow, and his bowers cold, but king he was of elvish gold. He heard not the horns in the mountain-pass, he smelt not the blood on the trodden grass, but his halls were burned, his kingdom lost; in a cold pit his bones were tossed. There is an old hoard in a dark rock, forgotten behind doors none can unlock; that grim gate no man can pass. On the mound grows the green grass; there sheep feed and the larks soar, and the wind blows from the sea-shore. The old hoard the Night shall keep, while earth waits and the Elves sleep.'

J.R.R. Tolkien recites The Mewlips

J.R.R. Tolkien recites "The Mewlips" (a poem from "The Adventures of Tom Bombadil") "The shadows where the Mewlips dwell Are dark and wet as ink, And slow and softly rings their bell, As in the slime you sink. You sink into the slime, who dare To knock upon their door, While down the grinning gargoyles stare And noisome waters pour. Beside the rotting river-strand The drooping willows weep, And gloomily the gorcrows stand Croaking in their sleep. Over the Merlock Mountains a long and weary way, In a mouldy valley where the trees are grey, By a dark pool's borders without wind or tide, Moonless and sunless, the Mewlips hide. The cellars where the Mewlips sit Are deep and dank and cold With single sickly candle lit; And there they count their gold. Their walls are wet, their ceilings drip; Their feet upon the floor Go softly with a squish-flap-flip, As they sidle to the door. They peep out slyly; through a crack Their feeling fingers creep, And when they've finished, in a sack Your bones they lake to keep. Beyond the Merlock Mountains, a long and lonely road. Through the spider-shadows and the marsh of Tode, And through the wood of hanging trees and the gallows-weed, You go to find the Mewlips - and the Mewlips feed." http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching! tolkien, christopher tolkien, silmarillion, hobbit, languages, quenya, sindarin, lord of the rings, educational

J.R.R. Tolkien recites The Bath Song

J.R.R. Tolkien recites the Bath Song This delightful song is sung by Pippin while taking a bath in Crickhollow in "A Conspiracy Unmasked." According to the text, it was one of Bilbo's favorite "bath-songs." Whether it was a traditional song that Bilbo liked or one that he personally wrote remains unclear. The song recounts the virtues of hot water in comparison with rain water, stream water, ice water, and fountain water. Amazingly, hot water wins in all categories except one. Beer is said to be better than cold water for pouring down the throat and hot better for pouring down the back. "Sing hey! For the bath at close of day that washes the weary mud away A loon is he that will not sing O! Water Hot is a noble thing! O! Sweet is the sound of falling rain, and the brook that leaps from hill to plain; but better then rain or rippling streams is Water Hot that smokes and steams. O! Water cold we may pour at need down a thirsty throat and be glad indeed but better is beer if drink we lack, and Water Hot poured down the back. O! Water is fair that leaps on high in a fountain white beneath the sky; but never did fountain sound so sweet as splashing Hot Water with my feet!" http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching! tolkien, christopher tolkien, silmarillion, hobbit, languages, quenya, sindarin, lord of the rings, educational

J.R.R. Tolkien reads The Song of Durin

The Song of Durin was sung by Gimli to the Fellowship of the Ring as they journeyed through Moria. It was the second night of their trip through Moria and Sam Gamgee had just referred to it as "darksome holes." Gimli sang the Song of Durin, extolling the history of Khazad-dûm, in response. "The world was young, the mountains green, No stain yet on the Moon was seen, No words were laid on stream or stone When Durin woke and walked alone. He named the nameless hills and dells; He drank from yet untasted wells; He stooped and looked in Mirrormere, And saw a crown of stars appear, As gems upon a silver thread, Above the shadows of his head. The world was fair, the mountains tall, In Elder Days before the fall Of mighty kings in Nargothrond And Gondolin, who now beyond The Western Seas have passed away: The world was fair in Durin's Day. A king he was on carven throne In many-pillared halls of stone With golden roof and silver floor, And runes of power upon the door. The light of sun and star and moon In shining lamps of crystal hewn Undimmed by cloud or shade of night There shone for ever fair and bright. There hammer on the anvil smote, There chisel clove, and graver wrote; There forged was blade, and bound was hilt; The delver mined, the mason built. There beryl, pearl, and opal pale, And metal wrought like fishes' mail, Buckler and corslet, axe and sword, And shining spears were laid in hoard. Unwearied then were Durin's folk; Beneath the mountains music woke: The harpers harped, the minstrels sang, And at the gates the trumpets rang. The world is grey, the mountains old, The forge's fire is ashen-cold; No harp is wrung, no hammer falls: The darkness dwells in Durin's halls; The shadow lies upon his tomb In Moria, in Khazad-dûm. But still the sunken stars appear In dark and windless Mirrormere; There lies his crown in water deep, Till Durin wakes again from sleep." http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

J.R.R. Tolkien reads The Eagle's Song

J.R.R. Tolkien reads The Eagle's Song from "The Return of the King" And before the Sun had fallen far from the noon out of the East there came a great Eagle flying, and he bore tidings beyond hope from the Lords of the West, crying: "Sing now ye people of Minas Anor for the realm of Sauron is ended for ever and the Dark Tower is thrown down. Sing and rejoice, ye people of the Tower of Guard for your watch hath not been in vain, and the Black Gate is broken, and your King hath passed through, and he is victorious. Sing and be glad, all ye children of the West for your King shall come again, and he shall dwell among you, all the days of your life. And the Tree that was withered shall be renewed, and he shall plant it in the high places, and the City shall be blessed. Sing all ye people!" http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

J.R.R. Tolkien recites "Namárië" (Galadriel's lament)

In this 1952 recording, Prof. Tolkien recites the famouse poem "Namárië", Queen Galadriel's lament from "Farewell to Lórien" chapter in "The Lord of the Rings". Below is the original text version (Quenya), followed by English and Romanian translations. "Ai! laurië lantar lassi súrinen, yéni únótimë ve rámar aldaron! Yéni ve lintë yuldar avánier mi oromardi lisse-miruvóreva Andúnë pella, Vardo tellumar nu luini yassen tintilar i eleni ómaryo airetári -lírinen. Sí man i yulma nin enquantuva? An sí Tintallë Varda Oiolossëo ve fanyar máryat Elentári ortanë, ar ilyë tier undulávë lumbulë; ar sindanóriello caita mornië i falmalinnar imbë met, ar hísië untúpa Calaciryo míri oialë. Sí vanwa ná, Rómello vanwa, Valimar! Namárië! Nai hiruvalyë Valimar. Nai elyë hiruva. Namárië!" "Ah! like gold fall the leaves in the wind, long years numberless as the wings of trees! The long years have passed like swift draughts of the sweet mead in lofty halls beyond the West, beneath the blue vaults of Varda wherein the stars tremble in the voice of her song, holy and queenly. Who now shall refill the cup for me? For now the Kindler, Varda, the Queen of the stars, from Mount Everwhite has uplifted her hands like clouds and all paths are drowned deep in shadow; and out of a grey country darkness lies on the foaming waves between us, and mist covers the jewels of Calacirya for ever. Now lost, lost to those of the East is Valimar! Farewell! Maybe thou shalt find Valimar! Maybe even thou shalt find it! Farewell!" ,,Ah! precum aurul cad frunzele în vânt, ani îndelungi, nenumăraţi precum ramurile copacilor! Anii cei lungi au trecut asemenea sorbiturilor iuţi din dulcele mied, în sălile prea înalte, dincolo de Apusime, sub bolţile albastre ale Vardei, pe care stelele tremură în cântarea vocii ei, binecuvântată şi regească. Cine-mi va reumple pocalul? Căci de-acum Vestala, Varda, Regina Stelelor, de pe Muntele Veşnic Alb, şi-a înălţat mâinile precum norii; toate cărările sunt cufundate în umbre şi, în afara hotarelor ţarii cenuşii, întunericul zace pe valurile înspumate dintre noi, şi pâcla acoperă întru veşnicie nestematele din Calacirya. Pierdut, pierdut pentru cei de la Răsărit este Valimar! Cu bine! Poate că voi îl veţi regăsi pe Valimar. Poate că şi voi îl veţi regăsi. Cu bine!" http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

J.R.R. Tolkien recites the Ring Verse

J.R.R. Tolkien recites the Ring verse "Three rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie." http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

Christopher Tolkien reads the end of "The Lord of the Rings"

From the documentary "J.R.R.T.: A Film Portrait of J.R.R. Tolkien" (1996) http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

Christopher Tolkien speaks about "The Silmarillion"

From the documentary "J.R.R.T.: A Film Portrait of J.R.R. Tolkien" (1996) http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!

Christopher Tolkien on his father's languages

From the documentary "J.R.R.T.: A Film Portrait of J.R.R. Tolkien" (1996) http://www.tolkien.ro - The Romanian Tolkien Society Thanks for watching!